Wednesday, October 23, 2019

Judicial Watch: AP Reporters Gave DOJ/FBI Ukraine Info and Code to Private Locker of Paul Manafort in Apparent Effort to Push Criminal Prosecution







Andrew Weissmann organized off-the-record DOJ/FBI meeting with AP to exchange ‘clarification’ and ‘assistance’ in their investigation for details on former Trump Campaign Director Paul Manafort
 
 
 
(Washington, DC) – Judicial Watch today released two productions of heavily redacted FBI documents – 28 pages and 38 pages – about an April 11, 2017, “off-the-record” meeting set up by then-Chief of the Justice Department’s Criminal Fraud Section Andrew Weissmann, between the DOJ, the FBI and the Associated Press in which AP reporters provided information on former Trump Campaign Director Paul Manafort, including the numeric code to Manafort’s storage locker.


Two months later, in early June, Weissmann was hired to work on Robert Mueller’s special counsel operation against President Trump. Weissman then reportedly spearheaded the subsequent investigation and prosecution of Manafort.

Included among the new documents are two typed write-ups of the meeting’s proceedings and handwritten notes taken during the meeting by two FBI special agents.

According to a June 11, 2017, FBI write-up:

The purpose of the meeting, as it was explained to SSA [supervisory special agent, redacted] was to obtain documents from the AP reporters that were related to their investigative reports on Paul Manafort.
 
No such documents were included in the documents released to Judicial Watch.

During the meeting, the AP reporters provided the FBI information about a storage locker of Manafort (the Mueller special counsel operation raided the locker on May 26, 2017):

The AP reporters advised that they had located a storage facility in Virginia that belonged to Manafort…The code to the lock on the locker is 40944859. The reporters were aware of the Unit number and address, but they declined to share that information.
 
The reporters shared the information that “payments for the locker were made from the DM Partners account that received money from the [Ukraine] Party of Regions.”

The notes suggest the AP pushed for criminal prosecution of Manafort:

AP believes Manafort is in violation of the Foreign Agents Registration Act (FARA), in that Manafort send [sic] internal U. S. documents to officials in Ukraine AP has documentation proving this, as well as Manafort noting his understanding doing so would get him into trouble.
 
AP asked about the U.S. government charging Manafort with violating Title 18, section 1001 for lying to government officials, and have asked if the FBI has interviewed Manafort. FBI and DOJ had no comment on this question.
 
 
Also, according to the FBI write-up, “The AP reporters asked about FARA [Foreign Agents Registration Act] violations and they were generally told that they are enforceable.”

Although, according to the FBI write-up, “no commitments were made [by DOJ] to assist the reporters,” Andrew Weissmann asked the AP to contact foreign authorities to follow up:

[A]fter the meeting was started and it was explained to the reporters that there was nothing that the FBI could provide to them, the reporters opted to ask a series of questions to see if the FBI would provide clarification. No commitments were made to assist the reporters in their further investigation into the life and activities of Paul Manafort and the AP reporters understood that the meeting would be off the record.
 
***
 
They [AP reporters] reiterated what they had written in their article, which was a response from the Cypriot Anti-Money Laundering Authority (MOKAS) that they [MOKAS] had fully responded to Department of Treasury agents in response to [Treasury’s] request. The AP reporters were interested in how this arrangement worked and if the U.S. had made a formal request. FBI/DOJ did not respond, but Andrew Weissman [sic] suggested that they ask the Cypriots if they had provided everything to which they had access or if they only provided what they were legally required to provide.
 
***
 
The AP reporters asked if we [DOJ/FBI] would be willing to tell them if they were off based [sic] or on the wrong traack [sic] and they were advised that they appeared to have a good understanding of Manafort’s business dealings.
 
The reporters asked about any DOJ request for the assistance of foreign governments in the U.S. Government’s investigation of Manafort:

The AP reporters asked if there had been any official requests to other countries. FBI/DOJ declined to discuss specifics, except to state that the Mutual Legal Assistance Treaty requests are negotiated by diplomats, so they should remain at that level.
 
AP reporters told the FBI about payments in the “black ledger,” a Ukrainian record of allegedly illegal off-the-books payments:

The reporters advised that their next report, which was scheduled to come out in the next day or so after the meeting, would focus on confirming, to the extent that they could payments in the so called “black ledger” that were allegedly made to Manafort.
 
***
 
The impression that their sources give is that Manafort was not precise about his finances, specifically as it related to the “black ledger.” The AP reporters calculated that he received $60 to $80 million from his work in Ukraine, during the time period the ledger was kept. According to their review of the ledger, it appears that there is a slightly lesser amount documented based on all of the entries. The AP reporters accessed a copy of the ledger online, describing it as “public” document (Agent’s note – the ledger has been published in its entirety by the National Anti-Corruption Bureau of Ukraine, after it was given to them by Sergei Leshenko, Ukrainian RADA member [Ukrainian parliament] and investigative reporter.)
 
The AP reporters discussed an extensive list of issues, companies, and individuals that they felt should be investigated for possible criminal activity, including a $50,000 payment to a men’s clothing store; a 2007 meeting with Russian oligarch Oleg Deripaska; Loav Ltd., which was possibly incorporated by Manafort; NeoCom, which the AP reporters implied was incorporated solely to cover up money laundering; and other matters.

The reporters described an “internal U.S. work product that had been sent to Ukraine.” The reporters described it as an “internal White House document.” The FBI report stated that it “was not clear if the document was classified.”

“These shocking FBI reports evidence a corrupt collusion between the DOJ and the media, specifically The Associated Press, to target Paul Manafort,” said Judicial Watch President Tom Fitton. “These reports are further reason for President Trump to pardon Manafort and others caught up in Mueller’s abusive web.”

Evidently referring to these documents, Manafort’s lawyers alleged that Weissmann provided guidance and leaked grand jury testimony to the AP reporters investigating Manafort.

This document production comes in an April, 2019 Judicial Watch Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) lawsuit against the U.S. Department of Justice (Judicial Watch v. U.S. Department of Justice (No. 1:19-cv-00879)) filed after the FBI failed to respond to a July 5, 2018, FOIA request for:

  • All records concerning the April 2017 meeting between Department of Justice and FBI personnel and representatives of The Associated Press. This request includes all notes, reports, memoranda, briefing materials, or other records created in preparation for, during, and/or pursuant to the meeting.

  • All records of communication between any representative of the Department of Justice and any of the individuals present at the aforementioned meeting.
Under Mueller, Weissmann became known as “the architect of the case against former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort,” which produced no evidence of collusion between Manafort, the Trump campaign and Russian operatives. It indicted Manafort on unrelated charges.

In an October 2017 article describing Weissmann as Mueller’s “Pit Bull,” The New York Times wrote, “He is a top lieutenant to Robert S. Mueller III on the special counsel investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election and possible links to the Trump campaign. Significantly, Mr. Weissmann is an expert in converting defendants into collaborators — with either tactical brilliance or overzealousness, depending on one’s perspective.” Weissman oversaw the pre-dawn home raid of Manafort in what one former federal prosecutor described as “textbook Weissmann terrorism.” Weissmann reportedly also attended Hillary Clinton’s Election Night party in New York.

In May 2019, Judicial Watch uncovered 73 pages of records from the DOJ containing text messages and calendar entries of Weissmann showing he led the hiring effort for the investigation that targeted President Trump.

In December 2017, Judicial Watch made public two productions of DOJ documents showing strong support by top DOJ officials for former Acting Attorney General Sally Yates’ refusal to enforce President Trump’s Middle East travel ban executive order. In one email, Weissmann applauds Yates, writing: “I am so proud. And in awe. Thank you so much. All my deepest respects.”



SOURCE
https://www.judicialwatch.org/press-releases/judicial-watch-ap-reporters-gave-doj-fbi-ukraine-info-and-code-to-private-locker-of-paul-manafort-in-apparent-effort-to-push-criminal-prosecution/


FBI & CIA Employees "Very Scared & Very Worried" of John Durham's Investigation









FBI, CIA Fear Indictments Over Spygate Probe


Employees of intelligence agencies may be “very scared and very worried” of U.S. Attorney John Durham’s investigation of the origins of the Obama administration’s surveillance of Donald Trump’s presidential campaign in 2015 and beyond, speculated Hans von Spakovsky, a Heritage Foundation senior legal fellow, in a Monday interview on SiriusXM’s Breitbart News Tonight with host Rebecca Mansour and special guest host David Ng.



Under James Comey’s former directorship of the FBI, the federal government surveilled Trump’s political associates as early as 2015, ostensibly as a “counterintelligence” operation on alleged Russian “interference” in 2016’s presidential election.


In May, Attorney General William Barr appointed U.S. attorney John Durham to head the aforementioned investigation of the Obama administration’s surveillance of Trump’s campaign, including the use of surveillance warrants via the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA),


Von Spakovsky said, “If these CIA analysts were providing false information or false and fraudulent assessments in order to get a counterintelligence operation started against the president, then boy, they’d better get lawyers, because they not only engaged in an abuse of their authority, but they probably broke federal law in what they were doing.”

“We know there’s a problem in the intelligence agencies,” said von Spakovsky of political and partisan functionaries within the intelligence agencies. “All you have to do is look at the ridiculous whistleblower complaint filed by the non-whistleblower against the president in a phone call in the Ukraine to understand that there is a lot of bias inside of our intelligence agencies, which does not give one a great deal of confidence in the accuracy and credibility of the work they’re supposed to be doing, which is analyzing the national security threats to the United States.”

Von Spakovsky contrasted Durham’s investigation with a forthcoming report from the Justice Department Inspector General Michael Horowitz regarding possible abuses of power by the FBI in its obtainment of a surveillance warrant on former Trump campaign official Carter Page.

“The inspector general only has the power to report on any wrongdoing, fraud, [or] abuse that he finds,” von Spakovsky stated. “An inspector general can make a recommendation at the end of the report [that] the Justice Department prosecute someone, but he has no power to do it. John Durham, on the other hand, as a U.S. attorney, can also issue a report just like the IG did, but if he finds criminal wrongdoing, he can impanel a grand jury and criminally prosecute anyone that he believes may have broken the law.”

Von Spakovsky added, “Everyone should remember it is against the law for the CIA to operate domestically, and if they were engaging in domestic operations to spy on American citizens, including people working inside the Trump campaign, then they did break federal law and they are in a lot of trouble, or they should be in a lot of trouble.”


“If [the CIA] discovers foreign espionage going on inside the United States, they have to turn that over to the FBI,” continued von Spakosvky. “The FBI has a huge counterintelligence division whose only job it is to stop foreign espionage going on inside the United States. The CIA cannot do that. Their task is to operate abroad and to gather intelligence for the United States. Counterintelligence [is] the FBI’s responsibility.”

Von Spakovsky went on, “If the CIA handed over false information or information they had not checked and verified to the FBI, then the CIA people are potentially in trouble, as would be the FBI if they then did not verify or check the information they were getting from the CIA. We know they didn’t do that when it came to the Steele dossier. The FBI didn’t check any of that information.”
“I think … maybe folks in the intelligence agencies [are] very scared and very worried about the investigation that John Durham is doing, and hoping that this distracts the public and distracts Congress,” estimated von Spakovsky.

Comey has mocked concernsabout the FBI’s surveillance of Trump’s campaign as “conspiracy theories.” He also denied that the FBI — under his directorship — “spied on the Trump campaign” or engaged in “corruption.”


SOURCE
http://beforeitsnews.com/politics/2019/10/fbi-cia-employees-very-scared-very-worried-of-john-durhams-investigation-3145160.html

Obama Caught at Soros Home Meddling in Trump’s Reelection, Gets Reality Check - Video







Facts are more difficult than the lefts agenda! This is where the real criminals are meeting and the deaf dumb and blinded Demonocrats have zero clue! Treason is punishable by death!



ARREST THEM ALL FOR SEDITION AND TREASON AGAINST THE AMERICAN PEOPLE AND OUR PRESIDENT 😠



Arrest and charge the s o b for the crimes he committed to our Nation and its citizens. Reveal what he really is and the corruption and lawlessness.



TRUMP BETTER DO SOMETHING BEFORE THEY TAKE OVER….


Our country and the PEOPLE that live here. Have been taken to the cleaners by are rogue and treasonous government…for the last 45 years… And i want reparations….


Where is an earthquake when you need one? Obama is the lowest rat in the swamp.


O’TRAITOR, SCUMOS, HOLDOUT AND THE SEDITIONIST COLLUSIONIST HIGH TREASONOUS AT THE MSM AND THESE TRAITORS SHOULD GET A ONE WAY TICKET TO GITMO. LEGALLY EXECUTE THEM ALL NOW GOD BLESS



Meddling in the election stealing America Rights America Voice


WHERE IS BARR?????AND WHERE IS IG REPORT


Obama Doesn’t know anything about FAIR He did enough damage!!!


I didn’t vote for Obama and think he and Hillary Clinton should be locked up!!


Treasonous scum demonrats



They are practicing hanging out with each other because they know they will be hanging in Gitmo. By the neck 🤪


This should tell us all that Obama is evil along with the Soros


We need to spy on these 2 enemies of the country……they have done too much damage to this country


His movement will never work.!!!!!!! His presidency didn’t work either,no not for America. America’s Soul will soar again, because God choose my president DJTrump for RESTORATION of America.



SOURCE
http://beforeitsnews.com/obama/2019/10/obama-caught-at-soros-home-meddling-in-trumps-re-election-gets-reality-check-video-2486042.html


 

Victory for Assange, Epstein Alive, Barr & Durham, Trudeau Wins, Disney Arrest




 
 
 
Australia has betrayed him. Our WW2 Diggers would be shocked. I cannot wait until l see him free & thank you Beloved President Trump & people of USA for not forgetting about him & Chelsie Manning. Love from Australia. 🌹R.S.
 
May I humbly suggest that you not be so open about your location, travel plans, etc. You may have no fear, but collateral damage is nothing but cover for the deep state. M.W.
 
Psalm 141 5. Let a righteous man strike me – that is a kindness; let him rebuke me – that is oil on my head. My head will not refuse it. For my prayer will still be against the deeds of evildoers. 6. Their rulers will be thrown down from the cliffs and the wicked will learn my words were well spoken.
 
 

Trump Mentions Obama Execution Last Night On Fox News.. Bone Chilling!




 
 
 
The Dems “Not above the law” how much more do they need to go then before enough is enough and take them to court. L.M.
 
I believe Predident Trump is saying, Obama committed many treasonous acts that could have gotten him the death penalty. L7072
 
Psychic Utsava says he was executed by firing squad Oct 3rd Michael by lethal injection. Clones or doubles with voice overs have been put out but they are abroad as close scrutiny wont spot it as easily. You never know. C.D.
 
The Dems have tried to deep six him many times. They are still trying. He has layers of security working for him. Thank God! D.P.
 
The EU refuses to accept any no-deal Brexit. Secret anti-corruption arrests and restructure.










 

 
SOURCE
 
 
 

Tuesday, October 22, 2019

'I despise that asshole': Former DNC staffer criticizes Sanders for defending Tulsi Gabbard

 
 
 
 
A former Democratic National Committee staffer expressed his anger toward 2020 presidential candidate Bernie Sanders after he defended Tulsi Gabbard from Hillary Clinton's accusation that she is supported by Russia.
 
 
Gabbard and Clinton have exchanged insults over the last week, which began when Clinton accused the Hawaii congresswoman of being a Russian asset. Sanders followed in the footsteps of fellow presidential candidates Andrew Yang and Beto O'Rourke in condemning the remarks from Clinton.

Adam Parkhomenko, who served as the field director for the DNC in the lead up to the 2016 election, tweeted, “Bernie joins Trump and thousands of Russian bots in defending the person who blamed the US instead of Assad for gassing his own people. Not to mention his not so stellar voting record on Russian sanctions."




 

“F--- Bernie. I’d forgotten how much I despise that asshole. Thanks for the reminder,” he added in a subsequent tweet.

Sanders came to Gabbard's defense Monday evening saying, "Tulsi Gabbard has put her life on the line to defend this country. People can disagree on issues, but it is outrageous for anyone to suggest that Tulsi is a foreign asset."

Gabbard responded to Clinton's comments hours after they surfaced, calling her "the queen of warmongers" and accusing her of being the "embodiment of corruption."

She resigned from her post as the vice chairwoman of the Democratic National Committee in 2016 to endorse Sanders.

SOURCE
https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/news/i-despise-that-asshole-former-dnc-staffer-criticizes-sanders-for-defending-tulsi-gabbard



     
 

Jeffrey Epstein accuser: We had orgy with Prince Andrew when I was 18




Virginia Roberts Giuffre

 

Prince Andrew was Jeffrey Epstein's 'trophy' to impress people

 
Prince Andrew is being haunted over his close ties with Jeffrey Epstein, with an explosive documentary airing in the UK Monday night — including claims the pair had an orgy with nine young girls on the pedophile’s private island.

While the royal long dubbed “Randy Andy” has strenuously denied being involved in his friend’s sex ring, the salacious details already leaking from “The Prince and the Pedophile” have only intensified the spotlight on the friendship that Andrew has admitted was a “mistake and an error.”

The special by Channel 4’s “Dispatches” is taking a deep dive into the pair’s close ties — including the claims in 2015 court papers that they had group sex on Epstein’s so-called “orgy island” of Little St James, according to the Times of London.

“The third time I had sex with Andy was in an orgy on Epstein’s private island in the US Virgin Islands. I was around 18 at the time,” longtime accuser Virginia Roberts Giuffre wrote in the Florida court docs.

“Epstein, Andy, approximately eight other young girls and I had sex together. The other girls all seemed and appeared to be under the age of 18 and didn’t really speak English.

“Epstein laughed about the fact they couldn’t really communicate, saying that they are the ‘easiest’ girls to get along with,” claimed Giuffre.

Roberts has long claimed that Epstein forced her into having sex with “powerful men, including politicians and business executives.”

At the same time she alleged her royal orgy, she also claimed former President Bill Clinton had visited Epstein’s island in 2002 — though she made it clear she never had sex with him or saw him having sex with others.

“Dispatches” will prove Andrew met Epstein at least 10 times during their 12-year friendship and the royal sometimes stayed with him for several days, according to the Times.


Prince Andrew, Virginia Roberts Giuffre and Ghislaine Maxwell
Prince Andrew, Virginia Roberts Giuffre and Ghislaine Maxwell
They were so close, the perverted moneyman had 13 different numbers for Andrew, private investigator Mike Fisten claims.

Epstein — who hanged himself in a Manhattan lockup this summer — saw Andrew as his ultimate “trophy” among a collection of important people, socialite Lady Victoria Hervey reportedly told the doc.

“Dispatches” also obtained medical records that appear to support her claims of abuse — with her suffering three weeks of vaginal bleeding in 2001, the Times of London said.

“Without going into the details of the sexual activities I was forced to endure, there were times when I was physically abused to the point that I remember fearfully thinking that I didn’t know whether I was going to survive,” she wrote in a separate legal declaration from 2015, according to the paper.
Andrew has denied the “abhorrent” claims against him — and insisted he had no idea about his friend’s sick secret life.

“At no stage during the limited time I spent with him did I see, witness or suspect any behavior of the sort that subsequently led to his arrest and conviction,” he has said.

Buckingham Palace has also said that “any suggestion of impropriety with underage minors is categorically untrue.”



SOURCE
https://nypost.com/2019/10/21/jeffrey-epstein-accuser-we-had-orgy-with-prince-andrew-when-i-was-18/


 

REPOST: Makin Island. A true story about 19 marines killed on an island defending against the Japanese during WWII.







A true story  about 19 marines killed on an island (defending against the Japanese). They  had to retreat, so asked the islanders to please bury them for us. Years later, they checked and found a man who had been a teenager then and remembered where  they were buried.
 
They sent a C130 and an honor guard over there and found  all 19 had been buried with their helmets on, their rifles   in their hands, in  perfect condition. The is Islanders had really done a wonderful job. As they were  loading the bodies, a voice from out of nowhere started singing The Marine Hymn"..........gave everyone goose bumps.
 
Turns out, the   voice was from a  man who spoke no English but remembered a song the Marines taught him when they landed. Very touching. They got all 19 and their photos   are at the end.  This of course was WW2!   IF YOU HAVEN'T  SEEN THIS - BE SURE YOU'RE SITTING DOWN. THIS ONE OF THOSE GESTURES FOR  WHICH THERE ARE NO WORDS..
 
 
Click on link below FOR YOUTUBE VIDEO:

 
 
 
.....................................................................
 
 
Marine Corps Raiders Home At Last
17 August 2001
Friday August 17, 2001: WWII Marines Buried at Arlington  Playing "Onward! Christian Soldiers,'' the Marine Band marched Friday along the twisting paths of Arlington National Cemetery to the open grave sites of 13 World War II Marines whose remains had lain nearly 60 years in a mass grave on a South Pacific battlefield.  The full honors ceremony marked the homecoming of 2nd Raider Battalion Marines killed during a 1942 raid on Makin Atoll in the Gilbert Islands.  The battalion destroyed most of its target, a Japanese seaplane base. But, hurriedly departing under fire from hostile aircraft, they were unable to carry away their dead.  "Marines of today draw inspiration from the 'Greatest Generation,''' said General James L. Jones, Commandant of the U.S. Marine Corps., at a  service in Fort Myer Chapel. ``We learn from their courage.''  Jones said the raid lifted American morale early in the war and demonstrated the nation was willing to take the fight to the enemy. A horse-drawn caisson carried a casket containing remains that forensic experts were unable to identify "These men were found in the same grave with their weapons and hand  grenades,'' said Bill Fisher, 75, a 2nd Battalion Raider.  A Marine honor guard lifted the flag-draped casket from the caisson and placed it among the coffins of individual Marines arrayed at the grave site in front of hundreds of family members. "Taps'' played by a lone bugler resonated through the silent afternoon. The flag from the casket with the remains of the unknowns was folded and given to Jones. Marines from the honor guard then handed each family the flag of its dead relative Hugh Thomason, of Bowling Green, Kentucky, took the flag of his half brother, Sergeant Clyde Thomason. "I had to sort of think of other things, otherwise I may not have been in a good emotional state to receive the flag,'' said Thomason, 80, also a Marine who served in World War II and Korea. "It is representative of the esteem him and the other men are held in by the Marine Corps and other Americans.'' Thomason, who said his half brother was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor, said, "It was very satisfying to bring the return of the remains to a close.'' The ceremony ended with a 21-gun salute. The Defense Department made an unsuccessful attempt to recover remains on Makin in 1949. The search was renewed in 1998 by relatives of the dead and other World War II veterans. The break came when searchers found an elderly island resident who had helped bury the bodies as a young boy. The 19 bodies were recovered two years ago and identified by the Army's Central Identification Laboratory in Hawaii. Six were returned to relatives who opted for private burials. Investigators said they will begin searching next year for the remains of additional missing Marines who, military officials believe, were captured and executed by the Japanese on Kwajalein in the Marshall Islands.
From a news report: Friday August 17, 2001 WWII Marines Buried at Arlington  Thirteen World War II Marines whose remains were discovered on a South Pacific island nearly 60 years after they fell in battle were buried under gray skies Friday at Arlington National Cemetery. The sun broke through the clouds just after a Marine bugler finished playing "Taps'' and the chaplain of the United States Marine Raider Association led a prayer with family members and others attending the service. "Today really signifies how the Marine Corps takes care of their own,'' said Captain Joe Kloppel at the end of the service. "This ceremony put a finalization on the sacrifice that the Marines made for their country 59 years ago.'' It was a final homecoming for the Marines killed during a 1942 raid on the Japanese-held Makin Atoll in the Gilbert Islands. An unsuccessful attempt to recover the bodies of 19 fallen Marines on Makin, now known as Butaritari, was made in 1949. The search was renewed in 1998 by relatives of men from the 2nd Raider Battalion and other World War II veterans. The bodies, left on the small coral reef island after the two-day raid, were recovered and identified two years ago when searchers found an island resident who had helped bury the bodies as a young boy. Six bodies were returned to families for burial. The remaining 13 Marines were flown Thursday from Hawaii to Andrews Air Force Base, where they were met by relatives and U.S. Marine Raider Association members. Marines carried the flag-draped caskets to hearses bound for Arlington. "They're finally home, which is where I want to be when  die,'' said 81-year-old Captain Joe Griffith, the battalion's only living officer. "They were good men and volunteers who did something over and above the call of duty by attempting to further the progress of engagement.'' Vernon Castle is one of the Raiders who will be buried on the 59th anniversary of the Battle of Makin, which was featured in the 1943 film ``Gung Ho'' starring Randolph Scott, Noah Beery Jr. and Robert Mitchum. Castle's sister, Vivian Yoder, traveled with her husband in a motor home from Hemet, California, to say goodbye. "It will really provide closure after all of these years,'' said Yoder, 78. "But there is something about military funerals that is always hard to take.'' Mary Baldwin of Spokane, Washington, said her husband, Robert, who died in December, served with the men. "Marines always take care of their own,'' she said. "It is extremely important for the men to be brought home and honored.'' Among the 13 was Sergeant Clyde Thomason, posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor during the war.

Marine Rainers Return Home PHOTO
Members of the Marine Corps Honor Guard carry one of the
thirteen caskets to its final resting place in Arlington National Cemetery. Marine Raiders Return Home PHOTO
A relative of one of 13 U.S. Marines killed during a commando raid
 on Butaritari Island in the Pacific Ocean during World War II
 touches a casket after full military honors are given to fallen
Marines of the 2nd Raider Battalion at Arlington National Cemetery. Marine Raiders Return Home PHOTO
Full military honors for 13 U.S. Marines killed during a commando raid on
Butaritari Island in the Pacific Ocean during World War II are given to fallen
        Marines of the 2nd Raider Battalion at Arlington Cemetery outside Washington,
August 17, 2001. Marine Raiders Return Home PHOTO
Members of the family of Pvt. Franklin Nodand look over an
America flag that draped the casket of Nodland during
 funeral services at Arlington National Cemetery in
Arlington, Virginia, Friday, August 17, 2001. Nodland was one of
13 World War II Marines whose remains were discovered on a South |
Pacific island nearly 60 years after they fell in battle. Marine Raiders Return Home PHOTO
Family and friends of 13 World War II Marines killed during a 1942
 raid on the Japanese-held Makin Atoll in the Gilbert Islands, look
over the caskets during funeral services at Arlington National
Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia, Friday, August 17, 2001. Marine Raiders Return Home PHOTO
A caisson carrying one of 13 World War II Marines, whose remains
 were discovered on a South Pacific island nearly 60 years after they
fell in battle, arrives for funeral service at Arlington National
Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia, Friday, August 17, 2001.

Marine Raiders From World War II
Arrive At Andrews Air Force Base
16 August 2001 Marine Raiders Return Home PHOTO
Evans C. Carlson, center, is helped up from his wheelchair by an unidentified Marine and his 
daughter, Karen  Carslon Loving, right, at Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland., Thursday, August
16, 2001 during a ceremony where the remains of 13 Marines arrived for transport to
Arlington National Cemetery, where they will be buried Friday. The men were among 19 Marines 
from the 2nd Raider Battalion who were killedduring a raid August 17, 1942, raid on the 
Japanese-held Makin Atoll, now known as Butaritari, in the Gilbert islands.


Marine Raiders Return Home PHOTO
A Marine honor guard carry a casket at Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland
Thursday, August 16, 2001, of the remains of one of 13 Marines killed on a South
Pacific atoll during World War II. The remains will be buried at Arlington National
Cemetery on Friday. Marine Raiders Return Home PHOTO
A Marine salutes at Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland Thursday, August 16, 2001
as an honor guard carries the casket containing the remains of one of 13 Marines
killed on a South Pacific atoll during World War II.


Wednesday August 15, 2001   Remains of WWII Marines Headed Home Marine Raiders Returning Home PHOTO
Major Chris Hughes stands by as Terilyn Stephens, 24, places a bouquet of
anthuriums on the casket of one of 13 Marines killed in action on a South Pacific
atoll during World War II at Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii, Wednesday, August 15,
 2001. Stephens, of Valdez, Alaska, the 24-year-old great-niece of Corporal Robert B.
Pearson of Lafayette, California, placed anthurium flowers on one of the caskets as a
gesture on behalf of the families of the 13. The 13 are among 19 Marines from the
2nd Raider Battalion who were killed during an Aug. 17, 1942, raid on the
Japanese-held Makin Atoll, now known as Butaritari, in the Gilbert Islands. The 13
 will be buried in a common area at Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia on
Friday. The remains of the other six were previously returned to families for burial.


Marine Raiders Return Home PHOTO
The caskets of 13 Marines killed in action on a South Pacific atoll in World War II
 remain on the tarmac at Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii, Wednesday, August 15,
2001. The 13 are among 19 Marines from the 2nd Raider Battalion who were killed
during an August 17, 1942, raid on the Japanese-held Makin Atoll, now known as
Butaritari, in the Gilbert Islands. The 13 will be buried in a common area at
 Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia on Friday.


Marine Raiders Return Home PHOTO
A Marine honor guard stands by as the remains of 13 Marines killed
in action on a South Pacific atoll during World War II are loaded into
 a KC-130 airplane at Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii, Wednesday, August 15, 2001


Marine Raiders Return Home PHOTO
Marine Corporal Justin De Castro salutes as the remains of 13 Marines
killed in action on a South Pacific atoll during World War II are
loaded into a KC-130 airplane at Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii, Wednesday, August 15, 2001.

Remains of WWII Marines to Be Buried Thursday, August 16, 2001; 6:48 p.m. EDT WASHINGTON –– The remains of 13 Marines killed on a South Pacific  island in World War II will be buried Friday at Arlington National Cemetery.  The men were among 19 Marines from the 2nd Raider Battalion who  were killed during a raid August 17, 1942, raid on the Japanese-held Makin Atoll, now known as Butaritari, in the Gilbert islands.   "They're finally home, which is where I want to be when I die," said  81-year-old Capt. Joe Griffith, the battalion's only living officer. "They were good men and volunteers who did something over and above the call of duty by attempting to further the progress of engagement." The remains were flown Thursday from Hawaii to Andrews Air Force Base, where they were met by relatives and U.S. Marine Raider Association members. Marines carried the flag-draped caskets to hearses,  which carried the men to Arlington. Vernon Castle is one of the Raiders who will be buried on the 59th anniversary of the Battle of Makin. Castle's sister, Vivian Yoder, traveled with her husband in a motor home from Hemet, Calif., to say goodbye. "It will really provide closure after all of these years," said Yoder, 78. "But there is something about military funerals that is always hard to take." Harold Williams, a Marine from Hialeah, Florida, said that while the war was still raging, he had to dig up the remains of men who died. "They were buried without bags or boxes," said Williams, 75, of Hialeah, Florida, who fought in the battle. "Being brought to Arlington National  Cemetery is quite an honor compared to that." An unsuccessful attempt to recover remains on Makin was made in 1949. The search was renewed in 1998 by relatives of the dead and other World War II veterans; the break came when searchers found an island resident who had helped bury the bodies as a young boy. The 19 bodies were recovered and identified two years ago. The other six  remains were previously returned to families for burial. Investigators said they will begin searching next year for the remains of an additional nine of 11 missing Marines who military officials believe were executed on Kwajalein in the Marshall Islands after being captured by the Japanese.


HICKAM AIR FORCE BASE, Hawaii (AP) - The remains of 13 Marines killed on a South Pacific atoll during World War II received a solemn send-off Wednesday en route to their final resting place. A lone bagpiper played "Amazing Grace'' as he strolled past the 13 flag-draped caskets. Marine pall   bearers then loaded them into a KC-130 Marine Corps airplane for transport to Arlington National Cemetery, where they will be buried Friday. "There is no statute of limitations on honor,'' said Senator Daniel K. Inouye, D-Hawaii. "It is never too late to do what is right.'' The 13 were among 19 Marines from the 2nd Raider Battalion who were killed during an August 17,   1942, raid on the Japanese-held Makin Atoll, now known as Butaritari, in the Gilbert Islands. Their bodies, left on the small coral reef island after the two-day raid, were buried together by local residents. An unsuccessful attempt to recover remains on Makin was made in 1949. The search was renewed in 1998 by relatives of the dead and other World War II veterans; the break came when searchers found an island resident who had helped bury the bodies as a young boy. The 19 bodies were recovered and identified two years ago. The other six remains were previously returned to families for burial. Among the 13 was Sergeant Clyde Thomason, who was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honorduring the war. His half-brother, Hugh Thomason, 80, of Bowling Green, Kwntucky will be among more than 40 of the late sergeant's extended family who will be at Friday's service. "During all of 50 years, I never expected that they would ever be found,'' said Thomason, a retired Colonel in the Marine Reserves. "Finally, it was all brought about.'' Investigators said they will begin searching next year for the remains of an additional nine of 11 missing   Marines who military officials believe were executed on Kwajalein in the Marshall Islands after being captured by the Japanese. 


PRESS ADVISORY from the United States Department of Defense
No. 157-P PRESS ADVISORY 
August 14, 2001 The commandant of the Marine Corps, Gen. James L. Jones, will speak at a memorial service for Marines of the 2nd Raider Battalion who were killed during a raid on Butaritari Island in 1942.  The service and subsequent burial will take place at Arlington National Cemetery on Friday, Aug. 17 at 11 a.m. EDT. The remains are those of Captain Gerald P. Holtom, Palo Alto, California; Sergeant Clyde Thomason Atlanta, Georgia; FM1 Vernon L.Castle, Stillwater, Oklahoma; Corporal Daniel A. Gaston, Galveston, Texas;Corporal Edward Maciejewski, Chicago, Illinois; Corporal Robert B. Pearson, Lafayette, California; Private First Class William A. Gallagher, Wyandotte, Michigan; Private First Class Kenneth M. Montgomery, Eden, Wisconsin; Private First Class JohnE. Vandenberg, Kenosha, Wisconsin; Private Carlyle O. Larson, Glenwood, Minnesota; Private. Robert B. Maulding, Vista, California; Private Franklin M. Nodland, Marshalltown, Iowa; and Private Charles A. Selby, Ontonagon, Michigan. The families of six other Marines killed during the raid elected to have private burials.  A casket containing co-mingled remains will be interred during the ceremony in addition to the 13 individual caskets. The 19 Marines were killed during a raid on Butaritari Island, in the Makin Atoll, August 17-18, 1942.  They were members of the 2nd Raider Battalion, a Marine unit organized and trained to conduct commando and guerrilla-style attacks behind enemy lines.  The unit was led by then-Lieutenant Colonel Evans Carlson and his  econd-in-command, Major James Roosevelt, son of President Franklin D. Roosevelt.  Sergeant Clyde Thomason, whose remains will be among those interred Friday, was the first enlisted Marine to earn the Medal of Honor in World War II. During the two-day battle, the Raiders killed an estimated 83 Japanese soldiers, but their attempts to leave the island were bedeviled by a high and crashing surf and they were unable to evacuate the bodies of their fallen comrades. In November 1999, a recovery team from the U.S. Army Central Identification Laboratory, Hawaii (CILHI), uncovered a mass grave on Butaritari Island and excavated the remains.  The remains were transported to CILHI where an exhaustive process led to the identification of the Marines and the subsequent notification of their families. The remains will arrive at Andrews Air Force Base, Maryland, on Thursday at 9:30 a.m.  An arrival ceremony will be conducted by Marines from Marine Barracks, Washington, D.C. and the President's Own, United States Marine Band.  For media access to the arrival at Andrews or the ceremony at Arlington, contact Marine Capt. Joseph Kloppel at (703) 614-4309.


May 28, 2001
Please note the story was written by Michael Burge and appeared in The San Diego Union-Tribune on May 28, 2001. It was an honor for me to meet the Marines who served in that raid, and to tell the story of bringing their comrades' remains back home. My interview with the late Buck Stidham stays with me to this day. I have no objection to its appearance, but I'd appreciate it if you credit me and my newspaper, which owns the copyright. Thank you.
Michael Burge, Staff Writer, The San Diego Union-Tribune VISTA -- It's been a long time since Bob Maulding  left his home and family on their avocado ranch here. So long ago that everyone is gone. His older brother went down with a submarine in 1943. His mother and father, who lost two sons in World War II, have been dead for 20 years. His younger brother died in 1988. Though Maulding has no close family left to remember him, his friends refused to forget that he and other Marines were cut down and left behind on a lonely Pacific atoll 59 years ago. His boyhood pal, Harry Reynolds, didn't forget. Nor did John McCarthy, whose sister was Maulding's fiancée. Maulding's fellow Marine Raiders, elite World War II commandos, reminded people constantly. And once engaged, the experts at the U.S. Army Central Identification Laboratory in Hawaii had a hard time forgetting, too. Because those people wouldn't forget, Private. Robert Maulding and his comrades will be coming home soon as honored war dead. On August 17, 2001, exactly 59 years after they were killed  in a short but furious firefight with Japanese soldiers on Makin Atoll, Maulding and most of his comrades will be laid to rest at Arlington National Cemetery. President Bush is invited. Almost brothers Harry Reynolds was more than Bob Maulding's friend. He was the closest thing to a brother a guy could be, without actually being one. So close that when the Maulding family moved to Beverly Hills in 1939, Reynolds moved with them. He wasn't going to stay at Hollywood High while Bob and his older brother, George, were living it up at Beverly Hills High. No way. The Maulding boys and Reynolds had a great time, until the vice principal caught on and banished Reynolds back to Hollywood High. But that wasn't the end of the world. Bob took up the trumpet at the insistence of his dad, a Hollywood musician. He and George traveled with a band to the Golden Gate International Exposition, and Bob led a high school dance band. The Mauldings played on the Beverly Hills High football team, which won a championship in 1940, right before Bob graduated. Bob was named all-league end. Life was nearly perfect, except that their younger brother, Jimmy, suffered from crippling arthritis. fter their dad bought an avocado grove on Fruitland Drive in Vista, the family summered there, and in 1940 Bob got a job at San Luis Rey Downs in Bonsall. Reynolds followed. They worked there three months, and loved it. "He and I had discussions about going into the horse business," Reynolds, now 79, recalled from his home in Las Vegas. They went to war instead. Staying together After the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, nothing was the same for George and Bob Maulding, for Harry Reynolds, for anyone in the United States. George joined the Navy, Reynolds the Marines. Bob, at 17, was too young to enlist, so he altered his birth certificate and signed up with the Marines. After boot camp, Bob proposed to Marie Ann McCarthy, who sang in his band. She was 16. The night they became engaged, they had their picture taken at the Hollywood Palladium. John McCarthy, Marie Ann's brother, was 11. "When he came home on his last leave from San Diego, he gave me the Marine Corps emblem off his hat," McCarthy said, even though Maulding risked not being readmitted to the base. "I still have it. It's a cherished memento," said McCarthy, who now lives in Irvine. Maulding and Reynolds trained separately at Camp Elliot in San Diego. Reynolds heard about a new outfit, the 2nd Marine Raiders Battalion. The commanding officer was Lieutenant Colonel Evans Carlson, whose unit slogan -- "Gung-ho," Chinese for "work together" -- would become an Americanism. Major James Roosevelt, the president's son, was executive officer. Roosevelt promised prospective Raiders they would be among the first to engage the Japanese. That was what Reynolds wanted. Maulding signed up, too. They were together again. Firefight in the palms In summer 1942, the United States was bent on stopping Japanese momentum in the Pacific. Japan had extended its realm as far east as the Gilbert Islands, on the equator, about 2,500 miles southwest of Hawaii. The U.S. armed forces planned a quick-strike raid on the Gilberts -- known today as Kiribati -- to divert Japanese attention from the pivotal battle taking shape at Guadalcanal, on Australia's doorstep. Two Marine Raider companies, including Maulding's, boarded submarines in Hawaii and set off for Butaritari Island, part of Makin Atoll in the Gilberts, to destroy a Japanese seaplane base there. It didn't come off as planned. Buck Stidham of El Cajon, a sergeant in Maulding's company, described the Makin Raid. It was about 3 a.m. August 17, he recalled, when the subs Nautilus and Argonaut surfaced off Butaritari in a heavy rain. "The seas were running a little high," said Stidham, 82. "Kind of a bad situation." The 220 Marines were to use 22 rubber boats for a dash to the beach. Only two of the outboard motors would start. The Marines bounced around in the surf, trying to get the engines to start, then drifted ashore. Well-rehearsed plans gave way to improvisation. A Marine accidentally fired his weapon, eliminating any hope of surprise. The Raiders lined up across the narrow strip of land and started walking. Soon they saw the Japanese coming, and the two sides fired at each other over a distance of 30 yards. "It was just two skirmish lines across the island, from palm tree to palm tree, in a big military version of the OK Corral," Stidham recalled. Nearly all the casualties occurred in those first minutes. Sergeant Clyde Thomason died trying to direct his platoon's fire, and would become the first enlisted Marine in World War II to be awarded the Medal of Honor. Not far away, Pvt. Robert Maulding lay bleeding on the sand. He had just turned 18. That morning the Marines killed nearly the entire enemy garrison, although they didn't know it. Two seaplanes tried to land, but Stidham and other gunners destroyed both. Two enemy boats appeared in the lagoon, but the Raiders guided fire from the submarines' deck guns to sink them. Japanese planes bombing and strafing the island hit no one. Carlson, believing the Japanese were massing to attack, consulted his officers and ordered a withdrawal. "That's when the trouble began," Stidham said. The Marines tried to paddle out through the breakers, but some boats capsized. About 60 men made their way to the submarines, but most were thrown back to shore by the surf, their weapons lost. The next morning, Stidham and Roosevelt and some Raiders forced their boats through the surf to a sub. Carlson's command, having determined that the Japanese were nearly wiped out, completed the mission, destroying the base and supplies. They got away by tying their boats together in the lagoon and paddling out of the inlet. They had no choice but to leave their fallen comrades. Carlson gave an islander $50 to bury the dead. Back aboard the submarines, the two companies were jumbled, preventing a full count until they reached Hawaii. Reynolds was waiting for Maulding at Pearl Harbor, but he couldn't find him getting off the sub. Maulding was one of 18 confirmed dead. Twelve others were missing and believed dead. Carlson counted 83 enemy soldiers killed. Keeping faith The Makin Raiders were celebrated as heroes, for while the raid may not have been strategically significant, it lifted the spirits of the nation. After the war, the Marines learned that nine of the 12 missing Raiders were captured and taken to Kwajalein, where they were beheaded. Their remains have never been found. A Japanese officer was executed for the war crime. One of Reynolds' last conversations with Maulding was on a destroyer, the night before they reached Hawaii. "We were up on deck, just talking, and suddenly he said to me: 'Harry, if anything happens to me, I  want you to do me a favor. Would you please tell my mom and dad how much I appreciated how they  raised me and all the good things they did for me,
and tell Marie Ann how much I love her?' " He then asked Reynolds if he wanted him to pass anything along. "I said, 'Hell, I gotta take your message back,' " Reynolds said. The Army seized Makin Atoll from the Japanese in 1943, but apparently no attempt was made to find the Raiders' grave. Five years later the Defense Department searched, but came up empty. Fifty years later, under pressure from surviving Raiders, the Defense Department told the Army's identification lab in Hawaii to find the Makin Raiders and bring them home. A lab team searched Butaritari in 1998, but had no luck. Then in December 1999, floods canceled a search team's scheduled trip to Vietnam, so the members detoured to Butaritari. The team surveyed the island with a resident who had helped bury the bodies 57 years earlier. "On the fourth day he was able to orient himself and pointed to a place where he believed they were  buried," said Johnie Webb, the laboratory's deputy director. The team trenched around the site and uncovered a skull. The search then exposed old explosives, more human remains, bits of buckles, snaps and other  hardware. Some Raiders had been buried in full uniform, and their helmets had fused to their skulls. After 10 days of digging, the team reclaimed 19 Raiders from a mass grave. It is among the lab's most significant finds. fter unearthing the bodies, the team still had to sort and identify them. To be positive, the Army  needed a maternal relative to make a DNA match. In Maulding's case, that was a tough assignment. Bob Maves, a casualty data analyst with the lab, said Maulding's maternal relatives had divorced and remarried, making them hard to find. A cousin in Botswana, Africa, was difficult to reach.  After much detective work, Maves tracked down the ex-husbands of Maulding's aunts. They put him in touch with their children, who directed him to their mothers. DNA from blood samples provided by the women made it possible to identify their nephew's remains last October. Private Robert Maulding was on his way home. Brothers at last Al and Daphne Maulding had sent two sons off to war, but neither came back. Bob died in the sand on Makin Atoll, and George disappeared with his submarine, the much-decorated Wahoo, off Japan.  It was customary during the war for families to display service flags, with stars representing sons or daughters in the armed forces. A gold star stood for a service member who had died, a blue star for one still alive. "When I came home from overseas, the first place I went was to see them," Reynolds recalled, "and when I got to the front of the house there was a service flag hanging in the window, with two gold stars and a blue one for me. "I choke up and a tear comes to my eye right now when I think of that. I knew I belonged to the Maulding family when I saw that."  The cousin in Botswana designated Reynolds as the "nearest relative" for the purpose of deciding what to do with Maulding's remains. So Reynolds, who had always regarded Maulding as his brother, now officially is. He will stand for Maulding, along with other family  members, at Arlington.


Honorable Burial at Last for Makin Atoll Heroes
Marines' remains left behind in '42 are found
December 26, 2000 Three of the men were from Northern California, and all of them, the Marines say, were heroes. The three were Captain Gerald Holtom, an intelligence officer who went to college in Berkeley and lived in Palo Alto, Corporal Robert Pearson, an infantryman from Lafayette, and Corporal I. B. Earles of the San Joaquin Valley town of Tulare. The remains of Sergeant Clyde Thompson, of Atlanta, the first enlisted Marine to win the Medal of Honor, were among those recovered. They were killed in a raid on the Japanese-held Makin atoll in the Gilbert Islands in the summer of 1942. It was a daring operation, conducted in great secrecy 2,000 miles behind enemy lines. The leader was the lean, leathery and tough as nails Lieutenant Colonel Evans Carlson. His right-hand man was Major James Roosevelt, son of the President of the United States. The raid electrified the country: It was hailed as the first successful Allied ground attack against the Axis. The Raiders' motto "Gung Ho!" -- a Chinese expression meaning "work together" -- became part of the American vocabulary. There was even a hit movie, with Randolph Scott playing Carlson. Yet the Makin raid was a victory that never was, a  muddled and confused affair in which the Americans nearly surrendered to a defeated enemy. The raid also alerted the Japanese enemy to American capabilities, and the Japanese took vigorous countermeasures with serious and bloody consequences. "This thing was a real screwup, a mess," said Ben Carson, a retired Forest Service officer who was a Private in the raid. Worse, the raiders left behind 19 of their dead comrades and nine living Marines. "Marines never forget their dead. Marines never leave their dead," said Jack Dornan of the Marine Raiderr Association, which is composed of veterans of the raiders, the elite of the elite corps.   .The nine Marines left behind were captured, taken to Kwajalein Island and beheaded. "This thing has been haunting me and many others for years," said Graydon Harn, who along with Carson led attempts to find the graves of the 19 dead Marines on Makin and have them returned to the United States. BREAKTHROUGH TO UNCOVER  REMAINS It was a long and difficult battle. The Defense Department had searched for the bodies in 1948 but found nothing. Years later, Harn and Carson, backed by their comrades in the Marine Raiders Association, began pressuring the Pentagon, writing their representatives in Congress and using  computers to broaden the scope of their work. "I could not have done it without the help of Congresswoman Elizabeth Furse, " Carson said. Furse, a Democrat from Oregon, represented the district near the Republican Carson's home in Hillsboro, near Portland. "I could not have done it without the computer," said Harn, who got a computer as a gift from his family. He went to work sending e-mails all over the world, especially to the island of Butaritari, which is part of the Makin atoll, a tiny slice of the independent nation of Kiribati. The Marine Raiders put pressure on the Pentagon's POW/MIA office, which has been working on identifying military remains in Vietnam. A forensic anthropologist and his team went to the island in 1998 and got a huge break when an 82-year-old islander named Bureimoa Tokarei came forward to say he had buried the men when he was a boy of 16 and knew the location. The remains, including dogtags and bits of uniform, were removed later, taken to the armed services forensic lab in Hawaii, where, using DNA and dental records, 19 men were positively identified  last month. The memory of those Marines was strong on Makin; when a U.S. Marine honor guard went to the island last winter to move the remains to the United States, Bureimoa Tokarei, who does not speak English, came to attention and began to sing the Marine Corps anthem. "He sang it completely," Harn said. "The whole thing. He knew more verses than I did." ELITE FIGHTING FORCE The pull of tradition and valor was very much part of Carlson and his raiders. The Raiders were an elite unit specializing in guerrilla tactics. They existed only for two years; then they became part of Marine legend. Carlson was the son of a preacher, a professional officer who had served in the Army in World War I, later joined the Marines as a private, became an officer, served in China and won the Navy Cross in Nicaragua in the 1930s. He also made powerful friends: while assigned to the Presidential Security Detail at the "Little White House" in Warm Springs, Ga., he was noticed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. Carlson went back to China and studied the guerrilla methods used by Mao Tse Tung and his communist army. He also took note of their "Gung Ho" spirit. Carlson wrote regular reports for the eyes of the president only. When America entered the war, Roosevelt was being pressured by British Prime Minister Winston Churchill to form a small, elite force along the lines of the British commandos. Carlson also was friendly with James Roosevelt, then a Marine reserve officer. He got the job, and two battalions of raiders -- called "Carlson's Raiders" by the troops -- were formed. Carlson made the younger Roosevelt his executive officer. Their first mission was a surprise raid on the obscure Makin Atoll. The purpose was to divert the Japanese from the real attack on Guadalcanal in the Solomon Islands, capture documents and knock the Japanese off balance. The Raiders, handpicked and led by Carlson himself, trained in amphibious war near Honolulu. But while Carlson was long on bravery and theory, he was short on detail. SUB-PAR TRAINING Carson remembers that though the men were to  make the assault from submarines, they never trained on subs and had never even been on a sub before. Nonetheless, in early August, they sailed from Pearl Harbor aboard two old submarines, the Nautilus and the Argonaut. But when they got to Makin, huge seas were running. "It was just a hellacious storm," he said, "The waves must have been 20 feet high."  They had a terrible time launching the rubber boats. In fact, they had never launched boats from a submarine. Many of the boats were swamped. They lost a lot of equipment, a lot of ammunition. The Marines -- there were 13 officers and 208 enlisted men -- got ashore before dawn when it was "as dark as the inside of a black cow," Carson said. The idea was to surprise the sleeping Japanese garrison. But one Marine accidentally fired his rifle, a sound that would wake the dead, and the Japanese boiled out of their barracks. It was the Raiders' first fight, and it was fierce. "I remember the heroism, " Carson said. "We were seeing that for the first time. There was the heroism of those men." The Japanese were outnumbered, but the Raiders didn't know that. The enemy made several terrifying Banzai charges, attacks that sent most soldiers  running, but not the Marines. The Japanese also employed snipers in the trees. It was a sniper who killed Capt. Holtom, the only officer to die. "He was buried near where he fell," Carlson wrote the family later. "He died like a man and a true patriot." The battle for Makin was desperate and confusing. The Marines ran short of ammunition, and at one point, Carlson thought the Raiders had lost and wanted to surrender. The Marines sent a note to the enemy by a Japanese messenger, but in the confusion the messenger was shot and killed. LAND OF CONFUSION By the next morning, it turned out that the Japanese were all dead. The Marines had won. But they were dissorganized. Some of them, without much direction, made their way back to the submarines. It was a terrible mess. Even the outboard motors didn't work, and neither did the radios. The men had to paddle out to sea, hoping to spot the submarines. They hadn't intended to hold the island anyway. But when they counted heads,  four Marines were missing, left behind. Five men volunteered to go back to try to find the missing men. "We were back in the safety of that boat," Carson said, "and they went back for their buddies." But Japanese planes had been alerted and flew over Makin and dropped bombs. The submarines dived, and when they surfaced, there was no sign of any Marines. The submarines couldn't wait. The element of surprise was gone and they couldn't stay in enemy waters. So they headed back for Pearl Harbor. They received a hero's welcome, and Adm. Chester Nimitz himself was there to meet the Raiders. It was a famous victory. DESERTED ON AN ISLAND On Makin, the lost Marines held out for a while, but they were alone, thousands of miles from friendly forces. They surrendered, and were killed by their captors on Kwajalein. The fate of those men still haunts the Marines. Old men now, but still proud. "There is one thing you learn in the Marine Corps," said Harn, who is 78 and in poor health. "There are feelings that last all your life. We became like brothers. Like brothers." Sixteen of the men from Makin will be buried at Arlington National Cemetery,  including all that is mortal of Holtum, the intelligence officer from Palo Alto, and Pearson, the infantryman from Lafayette. Earles will be buried next to his
father and mother in Tulare. There will be a ceremony at Arlington Aug. 19, the 59th anniversary of the day they died.  The remains of the nine Marines executed on Kwajalein have never been recovered. They are still there, like a memory that will not fade away.


In August 1945, the United States erupted in joyous celebration as Japan unconditionally surrendered and World War II came to a close. In the ensuing months, tens of thousands of American service members came home to a grateful nation and tearful reunions with their friends and families. However, the loved ones of more than 78,000 service members did not experience such reunions. For them, World War II never really ended as their family members and friends were listed as missing in action. In Nov. and Dec. 1999, the Army's Central Identification Laboratory (CILHI), based at Hickam AFB, Hawaii, recovered the remains of 19 Marine Raiders who died during the August 1942 raid on Makin Atoll. The recovery brought to a close a search that initially began in 1948 when a Graves Registration Team searched Makin Atoll for the bodies of the 18 Marines killed and 12 listed as missing from the raid but found nothing. Fifty years later, while en route to Hawaii from a search in Vietnam, a two-man survey team from CILHI was forced to divert to Makin due to heavy rains. While there, the team interviewed island residents and set the stage for later search operations. An excavation in May 1999 turned up nothing, but in November 1999, researchers discovered a mass grave containing human remains, equipment, and dog tags belonging to some of the Raiders. Bureimoa Tokarei, who was 16 at the time of the raid, helped bury the Marines and led investigators to within meters of the burial site. An exhaustive identification process conducted by CILHI, in conjunction with various other governmental agencies, led to the identification of 19 Marine Raiders that were listed as killed or missing nearly six decades earlier. They were identified as: Capt. Gerald P. Holtom, Palo Alto, Calif. *
Sgt Clyde Thomason, Atlanta, Ga. *
Field Musician 1st Class Vernon L. Castle, Stillwater, Okla. *
Cpl I.B. Earles, Tulare, Calif.
Cpl Daniel A. Gaston, Galveston, Tex. *
Cpl Harris J. Johnson, Little Rock, Iowa *
Cpl Kenneth K. Kunkle, Mountain Home, Ark.
Cpl Edward Maciejewski, Chicago, Ill. *
Cpl Robert B. Pearson, Lafayette, Calif. *
Cpl Mason O. Yarbrough, Sikeston, Mo.
Pfc William A. Gallagher, Wyandotte, Mich. *
Pfc Ashley W. Hicks, Waterford, Calif.
Pfc Kenneth M. Montgomery, Eden, Wis. *
Pfc Norman W. Mortensen, Camp Douglas, Wis.
Pfc John E. Vandenberg, Kenosha, Wis. *
Pvt Carlyle O. Larson, Glenwood, Minn. *
Pvt Robert B. Maulding, Vista, Calif. *
Pvt Franklin M. Nodland, Marshalltown, Iowa *
Pvt. Charles A. Selby, Ontonagon, Mich. * * Buried In Arlington National Cemetery Of the 30 Marines who did not return from the raid on Makin Atoll, 11 have yet to be found. Nine of the Marines, who were inadvertently left behind after the raid, were captured by the Japanese and later taken to Kwajalein Island, where they were executed. The location of the other two Marines remains a mystery, and search operations for those yet to be found are ongoing. The repatriated remains are returning to the United States as individual families make burial arrangements. Cpl. Mason O. Yarbrough's family were the first to lay their loved one to rest on Dec. 15, 2000, in Sikeston, Mo. Several of the families have opted for joint interment at Arlington National Cemetery in Washington, D.C., scheduled for August 2001. Among those laid to rest at Arlington will be Sgt. Clyde Thomason, killed during the raid as he became the first enlisted Marine in World War II to earn the Medal of Honor. His younger brother, Hugh, who followed his elder sibling into the Marines and served during World War II and Korea, sums up the general feeling of many of the families. "He was a fine young man and we are quite gratified to finally be able to bring him home," says Thomason. Shirley Anderson, great niece of Cpl. Yarbrough, says that the return of her great uncle finally brings closure to their family after so many years 1942 Marine Raiders Gravesite PHOTO
Photo By M. R. Patterson

Posted:  14 August 2001 Updated: 15 August 2001 Page Updated: 17 August 2001 Updated: 18 August 2001 Updated: 10 October 2002 Updated: 26 April 2003
Updated: 27 December 2004 Updated: 5 June 2009

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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  Purple Heart Medal
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  Purple Heart Medal
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  Purple Heart Medal
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 














Home At Last - Rest In Peace
Gerald P. Holtom
Captain, United States Marine Corps
Palo Alto, California GP Holtom Gravesite PHOTO
 
California State Flag
Clyde Thomason
Sergeant, United States Marine Corps
Atlanta, Georgia Clyde Thomason Gravesite PHOTO
 
Georgia State Flag
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  United States Navy Medal of Honor
Vernon L. Castle
Field Musician First Class, United States Marine Corps
Stillwater, Oklahoma VL Castle Gravesite PHOTO
 
Oklahoma State Flag
Daniel A. Gaston
Corporal, United States Marine Corps
Galveston, Texas
Texas State Flag
Edward Maciejewski
Corporal, United States Marine Corps
Chicago, Illinois Edward Maciejewski Gravesite PHOTO
Illinois State Flag
Robert B. Pearson
Corporal, United States Marine Corps
Lafayette, California
California State Flag
William A. Gallagher
Private First Class, United States Marine Corps
Wyandotte, Michigan WA Gallagher Gravesite PHOTO
Michigan State Flag
Kenneth M. Montgomery
Private First Class, United States Marine Corps
Eden, Wisconsin
Wisconsin State Flag
John E. Vandenberg
Private First Class, United States Marine Corps
Kenosha, Wisconsin JE Vandenberg Gravesite PHOTO
Wisconsin State Flag
Carlyle O. Larson
Private, United States Marine Corps
Glenwood, Minnesota
Minnesota State Flag
Robert B. Maulding
Private, United States Marine Corps
Vista, California RB Maulding Gravesite PHOTO
California State Flag
Franklin M. Nodland
Private, United States Marine Corps
Marshalltown, Iowa
Iowa State Flag
Charles A. Selby
Private, United States Marine Corps
Ontonagon, Michigan CA Selby Gravesite PHOTO
Michigan State Flag
All Gravesite Photos By M. R. Patterson, 3 October 2002

On Thursday, August 16, 2001 our firm was honored to serve the United Sates Marine Corp Casualty Affairs. We provided transportation from Andrews Air Force Base at ARLINGTON FUNERAL HOME, and housed overnight 13 casketed remains of World War II Marines killed in action on August 17, 1942 on the Makin Atoll the Gilbert Islands in the South Pacific. Moreover on August 17, we again provided transportation for their remains to be transported to their final resting place at Arlington National Cemetery.  It was an endeavor that gave us immense gratitude, and patriotic loyalty in serving those who, so many years ago, served us to protect our freedom. Our staff would like to thank the following for their assistance which made the entire transition flawless:  Old Town Funeral Choices, Alexandria, VA; Lee Funeral Home, Manassas, VA; Huntt Funeral Home, Waldorf, MD; Lacy Funeral Home, Louisa, VA; Lindsey Funeral Home, Harrisonburg, VA; Bacon Funeral Home, Washington, D.C.; Frazier's Funeral Home, Washington, D.C.; Danzansky-Goldberg Memorial Chapels, Rockville, MD; At Need Funeral Transfer Services, Washington, D.C.; The Officers and Troopers of the Maryland and Virginia State Police, and the support we always receive from the Arlington County Police. Thanks to all.  Charles Carey and William Halyak 
Management, Arlington Funeral Home
USMC Raiders: 1942 Gravesite PHOTO USMC Radiers: 1942 Gravesite PHOTO
Photos Courtesy of Roxsanne Wells-Layton, August 2006


SOURCE
http://arlingtoncemetery.net/raiders-1942.htm